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david ellison

Team radios

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The Decs have always relied on the caller shouting out the calls for the team to respond to without using radios and headphones. Usually this is fine but sometimes the arena p.a.'s are too loud for the calls to be heard, particularly by the guys at the end of the line. I'm not complaining about the sound levels though because it's great that the bigger festivals provide some quality systems.

This last weekend at Bristol, was a prime case - I finished one routine absolutely hoarse from yelling! So it's about time we thought about some sort of radio transmitter/receiver set up to make things easier. We are primarily talking about voice transmission rather than music and voice together.

If any teams have got set ups that they are happy with it would be good to hear the details

thanks

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David

Talk to JB. iQuad uses such a system and it seems to work very well. If you remember, many of us used our radios with their system at WISKF last year during the "64".

Another person to talk to is Mike Kory. Mike has done modifications to radios to suit his purposes.

You can find Mike at: http://www.ikeclub.org/

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iQuad is still using the radios that Mike modified when he was flying with us, I'd need to defer to him for the details - I just don't know. :blushing:

What I can tell you:

We use typical walkie talkies for receiving units... The only thing you might want to look at, is what kind of headphones they accept, also stereo or mono? Stereo works way better on loud fields.

For the transmitting radios, we use strong range Cobra models, with Mr Kory's modification to make them "hot" (transmitting) all the time they're turned on, NO receiving possible to the caller's radio. ;)

Also, a lot of radios cut off after 2-3 minutes, some sort of power saving thing I'd guess but it sucks for team calling.

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David

Talk to JB. iQuad uses such a system and it seems to work very well. If you remember, many of us used our radios with their system at WISKF last year during the "64".

Another person to talk to is Mike Kory. Mike has done modifications to radios to suit his purposes.

You can find Mike at: http://www.ikeclub.org/

Yeah, we use regular old FRS radios for calling with 180 Go. Mike modified the radio so it would lock on transmit for him, and uses a boom mic that he wears while calling. The receiving units are just ordinary FRS radios set to the right channel. Most of the team then uses their own personal earpiece that we like or fits snugly.

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Also, a lot of radios cut off after 2-3 minutes, some sort of power saving thing I'd guess but it sucks for team calling.

Depending on the radio, maybe it's a thermal cutoff as it heats up. At the range we use these, high power is not necessary. Maybe the higher power ones generate more heat.

(Yes, more power will be more resistant to interference from other radios on the same channel. We rarely hear anyone else transmit, though.)

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Yeah, we use regular old FRS radios for calling with 180 Go. Mike modified the radio so it would lock on transmit for him, and uses a boom mic that he wears while calling. The receiving units are just ordinary FRS radios set to the right channel. Most of the team then uses their own personal earpiece that we like or fits snugly.

Hmm . . . I might just have to bring my own FRS to the next IKE club fly :kid_devlish:

And . . . . Is the "modification" made with duct tape? :blue-grin:

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Wow we could sure use one of those team radio systems at nationals for the mystery pairs gig! Can anyone help us out?

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The standard FRS radios in the UK broadcast on a different frequency than those in the US, other than that they are pretty much the same.

I modified my radios with a bit of soldering and a new jack for the microphone, but you can use unmodified radios and duct tape to hold down the transmit button too.

Some radios will require a mod with a resistor to use your own mic, the duct tape method is the easiest!

Find radios that accept a standard headphone plug, some use a proprietary style which is a pain.

Also look for a transmitting radio that uses a standard mic jack or has a proprietary mic that you like. I use a mic that was made for indoor phones. I like it because it blocks the wind well and stays on my ear.

Goestoeleven, please bring your radio to any festival or club fly!

If everyone brought a radio and earpiece along with their 120's I wouldn't have to get all squeaky-voiced trying to yell loud enough at a mega-fly.

The cheapest radio that accepts a standard headphone jack will work. I've bought them for $20/pair at Wal-Mart and Target.

In my experience, the radios that accept standard 1/8" (3.5mm) headphones will have two receptacles: one for the mic, and one for the headset.

(Sorry for the sideways photo, some goofy thing about the iPhone)

post-14-131549526592_thumb.jpg

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Wow we could sure use one of those team radio systems at nationals for the mystery pairs gig! Can anyone help us out?

I wouldn't think you would need radios for a pairs routine. Especially with a mystery routine I would think both partners would want input on the next move. The radio setup is one-way so that the captain speaks, but can't hear anyone else. Which is perfect for team flying: I can't hear whining from the team and if they misbehave, they have to listen to me sing. :)

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The radio setup is one-way so that the captain speaks, but can't hear anyone else. Which is perfect for team flying: I can't hear whining from the team and if they misbehave, they have to listen to me sing. :)

I so feel you Mike! It's a shame team fliers don't come with a mute button! :kid_devlish:

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I so feel you Mike! It's a shame team fliers don't come with a mute button! :kid_devlish:

Oi I heard that (makes a change) lol

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The standard FRS radios in the UK broadcast on a different frequency than those in the US, other than that they are pretty much the same.

FRS (Family Radio Sevice) is not dissimilar in concept to PMR448 licence exempt radios for the UK/EU. But the frequency allocations are very different and PMR448 has only about 8 real channels available. Some manufacturers confuse this by referring to the different sub-audible tones used on each channel, which will allow one to selectively open the squelch, as [notional] channels. To be blunt, kite teams don't need particularly sensitive radios, given the operating range actually needed - better not to hear co-channel interference within 1-5km.

PMR448 prevents any modifications to the radios themselves (including swapping aerials, etc.), but plug-in headsets are fine. Throat mics may be worth exploring (for the caller) as a means of minimising extraneous pick-up - wind noise, etc.

If a team wishes to fly in the UK and USA, then separate radios will be required.

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