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Realistic low wind for new pilot of EXP


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Hi Teresa new here, i saw a post on another forum suggesting around about 10 mph is a good wind for the EXP,  i have just received mine but haven't flown yet, i'm also a new rev pilot.

cheers

This is the post i hope this helps

No kite is suitable for light winds - unless the flier's skills are up to it. It takes a lot to learn light wind flying and do it right. Skills - not equipment is the single most important thing needed. Too many have chased that demon and lost.

Does this mean that the proper equipment is useless - of course not! In both dual line and quads, there are models for light wind. Quads also offer you a variety of rods to choose from to meet your goals. But the finest equipment means  nothing if you don't know how to use it. All about skills ......

There are countless options on a good beginner quad. Most have already been posted here.Any good quad with maybe 2 frame choices, would be a very satisfactory starter kite.

Take the time to learn the basics in decent winds, then attempt light wind flying. No fun trying to learn control, when you are fighting to keep the sail aloft. Look for a 5-10 mph wind and get those basics down! 

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5-10 mph is ideal for a beginner. As mentioned you can't learn good control if you are struggling to just stay airborne. Also, low wind flying requires proper tuning which again requires more hands-on experience and additional brake (lines further out on the top knots) which is difficult to wrap your head around until you understand that the closer to perpendicular the sail gets to the direction of the wind, the more force it applies to the sail -- which is what keeps the kite in the air. Flying with maximum brake is difficult for beginners because the kite must be told what to do as opposed to moving forward on its own. You must have replaced the original leaders on the handles with extended ones in order to use maximum possible brake settings, so some equipment modification is necessary. The standard factory leaders are made shorter so the beginner (who seldom reads directions because "who doesn't know how to fly a kite", right?) can get the kite off the ground without struggling. Low wind flying is an "acquired" taste -- something you get used to by putting in the time. There is no magic equipment to buy which will make it happen immediately. The right equipment helps buy does not take the place of time on the lines. Get or make extended leaders for the handles and fly in wind that you don't struggle in. The low-wind thing will happen in time. Fly with experienced flyers as often as possible. They'll shave dozens of hours from the learning curve. Dunstable Downs sees a lot of quad-line kites I hear.

Good luck -- have fun, smile, and don't forget to breathe.

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2 minutes ago, makatakam said:

5-10 mph is ideal for a beginner. Anything less than 5 will be struggle. As mentioned you can't learn good control if you are struggling to just stay airborne. Also, low wind flying requires proper tuning which again requires more hands-on experience and additional brake (lines further out on the top knots) which is difficult to wrap your head around until you understand that the closer to perpendicular the sail gets to the direction of the wind, the more force it applies to the sail -- which is what keeps the kite in the air. Flying with maximum brake is difficult for beginners because the kite must be told what to do as opposed to moving forward on its own. You must have replaced the original leaders on the handles with extended ones in order to use maximum possible brake settings, so some equipment modification is necessary. The standard factory leaders are made shorter so the beginner (who seldom reads directions because "who doesn't know how to fly a kite", right?) can get the kite off the ground without struggling. Low wind flying is an "acquired" taste -- something you get used to by putting in the time. There is no magic equipment to buy which will make it happen immediately. The right equipment helps buy does not take the place of time on the lines. Get or make extended leaders for the handles and fly in wind that you don't struggle in. The low-wind thing will happen in time. Fly with experienced flyers as often as possible. They'll shave dozens of hours from the learning curve.

Good luck -- have fun, smile, and don't forget to breathe.

P.S. -- what town are you in?

 

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Hi Mak thanks for the info, no i'm still on stock leaders at the moment, JB recommended a set of his leaders which i should get very soon, flew my EXP first time today it was a bit windy but got in a few nice launches a couple of crashes an a few ok landings and then it rained haha, watching all those youtube video's helped a lot, i fly at Blackheath Common, which is near Greenwich i live in south east London,

cheers.  

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