Jump to content
  • 0

Buying a first Rev as a present


Cloania
 Share

Question

Hello everyone,

I'm pretty clueless of kites, so please forgive me.

I think a decent kite would be a good present for my boyfriend, and from what I can see online, Rev users get really into them.

I don't think he's ever flown quad line kites before, but I expect he's flown others. He picks things up quickly, and I think he's responsible enough not to hurt anyone in his learning process.

Bearing that in mind, and from trawling through this forum, it sounded like a B series was a good Rev to start with. Comments on this greatly appreciated. Ah, and even in the B series there's a load of choices - 1.5?

We live near Blackheath, London, where there's always a few people flying kites. I'm afraid I have no idea what the wind speed is, but enough to fly kites... (I've seen Rev flyers). He also spends a lot of time in Cape Town, South Africa. So no/mid/full vent? From forum trawling mid vent sounds like it's got more flexibility (not literally) than the full vent?? All advice on this welcome, as really, I have no idea.

OK, then there's things like wraps and lines and loads of options which I have no idea about. If I want to give him a package that means he can set it up and go and fly, what do I actually need to buy and how do I decide?! I live in the UK (although they're a lot cheaper on American websites, and do have time to get it shipped if buying via America is straightforward). This looked like quite a good package, and seems to come with 2 and 3 wrap frames and some 'laser pro gold lines' - http://www.kiteworld.co.uk/acatalog/Revolution-John-Barresi-Rev-1-5.html.

There's a lot of questions there (sorry!) - Are Revs the way to go in the quad line offerings? What kite? What vent? What 'accessories'?

Thank you for your help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

The B-Series package would be the best kite of choice because it comes with two complete frames already in the package, so you really don't need to purchase anything else. It is already in there. :) Unfortunately the B-Series is one of the most expensive as well. If the cost isn't a problem, then that would be my suggestion. If cost is a little tight, the normal 1.5 Series is a great alternative. It is basically the same size kite as the B-Series but the sail is a different material - Ripstop Nylon on the 1.5, Ripstop Polyester on the B-Series. The 1.5 also comes with the SLE leading edge rod and the standard 1/4" leading edge rod (instead of two complete frames). This does give you some flexibility on wind ranges, but is not quite as good as having two complete frames that you can change in and out of the kite.

As for line, Laser Pro Gold is one of the best lines you can buy. Shanti line is also very high quality. If you stick with these two manufacturers you will be fine. Normally, the only weight you would ever need is 90# test, even for the mid vent and full vent models. The length of line is personal preference. If he will be flying teams with other Rev flyers, you may want to get 120' lines. If team flying is something that will be in the future you can pick 120's up when the need arises. I would recommend getting line in the length of 75' to 100' long. These are the most common and will work great for you. If the lines are already packaged in the kite then just make sure they are Laser Pro or Shanti and you are good to go.

Now, for standard, Mid Vent or Vented, that all depends on the winds you will be flying in. The more wind you have, the more venting you will probably want in the kite. For a first Rev, the Standard model is usually the most preferred. This model will fly in winds starting around 5mph and can handle winds up to 15mph. As your skills build and if you have different frames, that wind range will be expanded. For most areas, the standard will work best. If you do happen to be living (or flying) in an area that always has winds over 10mph, the Mid Vent or Full Vent would be the better option. This is pretty rare though and the Standard is again, the most common and most sold model.

What an awesome gift and gesture. Your boyfriend will really love the gift and the Revolution kites are the best quad line kites on the market.

Hope that helps.

Let us know if you have any other questions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

<snip>

We live near Blackheath, London, where there's always a few people flying kites. I'm afraid I have no idea what the wind speed is, but enough to fly kites... (I've seen Rev flyers).

<snip>

Kent has provided excellent advice. The winds on Blackheath range from 'very little' as in last Sunday 10-12:30 up to 'too much' back in the spring after Easter. 'Very little' required the larger sails of the Zen and 'too much' was OK with the Mega Vented kite but fliers on the standard vented were working very hard. We fly on Blackheath most weekends when not away at kite events!

I would suggest at the beginning a standard sail would be best with the two frame options Kent mentioned as in the B-Series package. Get the 120ft lines because that is what is needed when flying in team <grins>

Felix

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I'd say you get him the kite, and then take it out to meet the Blackheath gang yourself!,...

learn how to assemble, install/tune the leaders and break-down the kite, line management techniques and some basic flight control explanations.

Then when he gets the kite you'll be the authority figure on how all the bits & thingies work

PLUS he'll be scratchin' his head with how you know all this crap & the proper terminology without any manly-man to lead you!

You can clean up the kite before his big unveiling hour arrives, so he'll never know it's not pristine & perfectly new right out of the package too.

"oh dearest, isn't it perfectly obvious how this must work? This piece goes right there and you manipulate that, to cause this effect in flight. This is called a_ ----_. I would assume you should do it like this, but I may certainly be wrong honey"

You can have a lot of fun with this insider set-up on your main squeeze and still be a part of his initial REV excitement, you will know the Blackheath gang personally and all of 'em will be in on the gag.

Ideally, you should fly it better than him that 1st time out as well, just so he knows how easy it is for most people to learn. The gang can give you enough flight experience to keep him humble, at least thru lunch time anyway!

This is an extremely thoughtful gift and you will get many miles out of it, trust me, I know from my own personal experience. My bride plays me like a musical instrument when new kites are in the forecast.

Welcome to the Revolution family

-plm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I'd say you get him the kite, and then take it out to meet the Blackheath gang yourself!,...

<snip>

Welcome to the Revolution family

-plm

The Blackheath gang would probably be able to help you using one of our kites rather than the gift! <grins>

Felix

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Okay, let's make this really simple: Get a B series 1.5 standard sail (no vents) package. These normally come with 90#/80ft laser pro gold (LPG) lines. Because you live near Blackheath, your boyfriend will like as not get into team flying quickly. So you will need 120' lines. Best to upgrade to those right of the bat. So when you order, ask for 120' lines in your package, instead of 80'. If you have time for delivery, order from either a wind of change (kent, above) or Theresa at thekiteshoppe.com.

Go visit the guys at Blackheath poste haste! :blue-grin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Clo

It sounds like a really nice idea to surprise your boyfriend with a Rev. Rev flying is a great way to loose an hour or two, a day or two or even a week or two, unwinding and chewing the cud with mates. Rev fliers tend to be a very sociable crowd as a lot of what Rev flying is about depends on cooperation.

I really don’t want to complicate matters unnecessarily and I certainly don’t want to put you off buying this gift, but before you decide which Rev to buy you need to think about where you see this going. Learning to fly a Rev is easy, learning to fly one well takes time and commitment.

If you see this as being a pleasant way to spend a couple of hours on a sunny summer Sunday afternoon then I would recommend you buy an EXP.

If you see him taking this thing a bit more seriously, then you have to think about it in the same way as you would if it was golf you were thinking about. You might buy him a putter to knock a few balls around the back lawn or a driver to bash the balls at a driving range, to get a feel for the game, but eventually he will need more clubs if he wants to play a full game. This is perhaps, why you are a bit bewildered by the amount of Revs to choose from.

Now the good news, it is not as scary as it looks, you are not looking at complete set of clubs, and certainly not straight off. I would still recommend you start out with one kite (see qualifier, next paragraph), a full sail B Series, that will get him started and then he wants to move things on a vented B (full, not mid-vent or extra-vent) that will pretty well cover the bases and allow him to call himself a serious “Rev Flier”. The rest are, for the time being, just extravagancies, very desirable extravagancies, but extravagancies none the less.

Qualifier – Unless you take Andy’s advice (above) and buy two, one for each of you, because otherwise, if he does take this seriously you are in serious danger of becoming a Rev Widow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Great, thanks all for your replies.

It sounds like a very happy Rev family.

Yep, I'm slightly scared of becoming a Rev widow!

I'm sure we'l be popping to Blackheath soon. I suspect I have very little talent and potential in kite flying though...

Cheers again guys, that's all really useful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Great, thanks all for your replies.

It sounds like a very happy Rev family.

Yep, I'm slightly scared of becoming a Rev widow!

I'm sure we'l be popping to Blackheath soon. I suspect I have very little talent and potential in kite flying though...

Cheers again guys, that's all really useful.

Clo, you will find that most of the top teams around the world have at least 1 female pilot. It's not a strength based skill so don't right it off until you try. Of course if you live in California or Southern France then the good weather and sunshine make it a little easier!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

No need to be a Rev widow. Just make him share the learning experience with you. When my wife and I got our first Rev we had a blast learning to fly it together. Then we got to the point where we didn't want to be constantly handing the handles back and forth. So we got another Rev. Now this was the tougher part as we'd often get far apart or even worse we'd fly end to end. :( However after we improved we got good enough that we can stand shoulder to shoulder and fly together. Not to mention in this whole process we've gained an entire family of Rev fliers that we get to see several times a year! I love the fliers around here and wouldn't trade the time flying with them for anything!

I will second Katrina's comment on the lines. Now that we've gotten into things we pretty much never fly on the 85 foot lines. It's either 120 feet or much shorter than 85 foot cause that's all the room there is. I really dig my 30 foot set for flying in all sorts of random places... ;)

Welcome to the family!

~Brett

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Clo, if you deal with kiteworld, they sort out import charges etc, nice people and local.

question for felix and all - re lines ? wouldn't standard 80 foot be easier and more imediate to learn with ?

fungus:)

Hmmm! I think that the 120s would be better in some ways and then there is no excuse for not flying in with others...

The walk is shorter with the 80s <grins>

Felix

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Clo, if you deal with kiteworld, they sort out import charges etc, nice people and local.

question for felix and all - re lines ? wouldn't standard 80 foot be easier and more imediate to learn with ?

fungus:)

Personally I don't think a different line length would have been harder as a beginner. As a total beginner I did a lot of up and down and never even used all of 80 ft. But then later I just moved into flying back and forth doing two 90 degree turns at each side. These were done nowhere near the edges of the window for fear of stalling. Once I got the hang of this I used the time between turns to practice speed control. Here is where I think the 120s would have been better and would have given more time to practice between turns.

~Brett

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...