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The Mother of knots


PMartin
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So...I have been flying at a local school. Last evening, I had found what I thought was an unused soccer field. I flew for twenty minutes before I noticed a small crowd behind me. Many of the people there were kids wearing soccer gear. I landed, yanked out my earphones, and asked a woman holding a clipboard if there was a soccer practice. I apologized profusely (I think it is important to be a respectful kiter), QUICKLY wound my lines and moved to another area. My lines were a bit of a mess and I decided to remove the lines from the handles also so that I could quickly untangle them. Rut-roh! That was a BIG mistake. I spent an hour on the field trying to clear them but frustration soon set in and of course, the wind was no help. Needless to say, my flying for the evening was over and I spent the next 3 hours at home sorting out this ever increasing mess. Whew, the satisfaction of once again having usable lines. It was a difficult way to learn a lesson but I'm kinda hard-headed and this seems to work the best for me. The hard way. FEAR THE KNOT!!! May your skies be blue and your wind steady. Peace.

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Yep, removing the lines from the handles and/or the kite is not a good way to untangle lines. As long as they are still hooked up, what you have is a tangle of loops ... reasonably easy to sort out. The second you remove the handles and/or kite, you now have a tangle of knots ... not so easy to sort out!!!

If you just can't stand it and want to remove something, then only remove ONE end of ONE line. Get a line winder (or better yet, small weaving shuttle) and wind the line on it as you work it back out of the tangle. Once that line is removed, then you can start on a second line ... etc.

If you haven't watched it yet, go watch JB's video on line management. The one point to engrave on your brain is that most tangles are really false tangles ... simply working and stretching the lines will cause tangles to disappear like magic.

Cheers,

Tom

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One other thing that a "fast field wrap up" can introduce is DEBRIS! You will get twigs, grass stems, and other things included in your bundle. These can prevent loops being extracted from other loops.

In another thread, I advised hooking the line-ends to a single object: larks-head them to a twig, cut 4 slits in the edge of a piece of cardboard, or anything to preserve the orientation of the line-ends in relation to each other. Do the same at the other end of the line set and then keep your "aggregators" away from the main tangle and each other. Don't let them pass through any loops (it makes knots), or between the lines leading to the aggregator (it braids the line - which is worse than wrapping the line).

One possible solution to a situation like yours would be to ask for help in removing your lines from the playing field. Ask if someone would carry your kite (while you carry the handles), with the lines kept taut, off the playing field. Then stake your handles down in the usual way and wind the lines in a normal fashion. This has three beneficial effects: it gets you off the field quickly; it makes winding a leisurely and thoughtful process; and most importantly, it involves the team (or at least one individual) in your problem. Once they become part of the solution, instead of you being a problem, your problem becomes something they want to solve. They have a stake ('scuse the pun) in the solution.

"If one of you would go grab that kite and help me walk the lines off the field, I can be out of your way quickly, and you can get to your practice." You can explain that the lines need to be kept taut on the way, but the first communication needs to be quick, simple, and point out the advantage to them.

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One possible solution to a situation like yours would be to ask for help in removing your lines from the playing field. Ask if someone would carry your kite (while you carry the handles), with the lines kept taut, off the playing field. Then stake your handles down in the usual way and wind the lines in a normal fashion. This has three beneficial effects: it gets you off the field quickly; it makes winding a leisurely and thoughtful process; and most importantly, it involves the team (or at least one individual) in your problem. Once they become part of the solution, instead of you being a problem, your problem becomes something they want to solve. They have a stake ('scuse the pun) in the solution.

"If one of you would go grab that kite and help me walk the lines off the field, I can be out of your way quickly, and you can get to your practice." You can explain that the lines need to be kept taut on the way, but the first communication needs to be quick, simple, and point out the advantage to them.

I think that is the absolute best advice. People are nice. We all share our parks. Most evenings here it is hard to find a spot to fly. That is what 30 foot lines are for.

John

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Thanks for the great advice. Jeepster, that was what I eventually did; I focused on one line at a time and it did work. Pete, the idea of simply asking for help is a GREAT idea and it didn't cross my mind. I have found that kids just love to watch my kite and I'm sure there would have been many volunteers. I also need to keep my area awareness sharp and not get focused too hard on just the kite. But it's just so darn purty!!! My dad always told me to learn something new and at 52, I know my father would be proud of me. Thanks again every one for your advice. Ooooooo....usairnet.com says wind today!!! May your skies be blue and your Revolution full. Peace.

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