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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/02/2020 in all areas

  1. 5-10 mph is ideal for a beginner. As mentioned you can't learn good control if you are struggling to just stay airborne. Also, low wind flying requires proper tuning which again requires more hands-on experience and additional brake (lines further out on the top knots) which is difficult to wrap your head around until you understand that the closer to perpendicular the sail gets to the direction of the wind, the more force it applies to the sail -- which is what keeps the kite in the air. Flying with maximum brake is difficult for beginners because the kite must be told what to do as opposed to moving forward on its own. You must have replaced the original leaders on the handles with extended ones in order to use maximum possible brake settings, so some equipment modification is necessary. The standard factory leaders are made shorter so the beginner (who seldom reads directions because "who doesn't know how to fly a kite", right?) can get the kite off the ground without struggling. Low wind flying is an "acquired" taste -- something you get used to by putting in the time. There is no magic equipment to buy which will make it happen immediately. The right equipment helps buy does not take the place of time on the lines. Get or make extended leaders for the handles and fly in wind that you don't struggle in. The low-wind thing will happen in time. Fly with experienced flyers as often as possible. They'll shave dozens of hours from the learning curve. Dunstable Downs sees a lot of quad-line kites I hear. Good luck -- have fun, smile, and don't forget to breathe.
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  2. Joe Hadzicky suggested me to watch this video
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