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Captainbob

Lines for Rev SLE 1.5 for beginner

Question

I just ordered a Rev 1.5 SLE and was thinking about ordering a spare set of lines for it. It comes with #90 85 ft, and I was wondering if I should get a longer set for the spare set like either 90# 100 ft or 120 ft, or stay with the shorter length until I get some more experience.

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Get the 120's because sooner or later you will fly with someone. I spend the most time on short lines, 30's and 50's.

A second set of 85's will chop down nicely to a set of 30 and 50...

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It really depends if you plan on doing team flying later. 120's are the std for team flying. Most of the other people in my area often fly 85'or shorter alone. But you can always practice on 120's as well and get used to the feel.

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It really depends if you plan on doing team flying later. 120's are the std for team flying. Most of the other people in my area often fly 85'or shorter alone. But you can always practice on 120's as well and get used to the feel.

Not really into team flying, so I guess I will stick with the 85 ft or shorter.

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Not really into team flying, so I guess I will stick with the 85 ft or shorter.

Not YET!!!!cat_lol.gif 120's really open up the wind window and give you a much bigger area to do things in!! Just a good thing to have - if the occasion arises!! Really though, it depends on where you fly the most - what length can you use comfortably in that area!! My most used set is only 50' long, because the small park I go to doesn't lend itself to longer lines! As always, adapt to what you have at your disposal!!ani_idea.gif

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Hey Capt'n bob, my son lives in Atlanta. He just needs someone local to push him outside to enjoy flying. Benjamin LaMasters Heck he'd probably drive to meet you

Flying with a partner occasionally (on those long lines you don' think you will need / use) it is the beginning of a new adventure on the wind. PM if you want contact info to another quad flier in your community.

He's a martial arts guy as a lifestyle, 20+ years, although his physical presence is not very intimidating,....

Ha! I can get away with saying that,

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I would strongly suggest 100 or 120 for two reasons.

1. Line sets last a long time, especially if you are flying alone. It should be a long time before you will need to replace your 80s.

2. When you do start flying with others, you will need 120s or 100s. We use both as most people we fly with carry both. If only of the two, 120s would be the best choice. We use 100s when there are only up to four or maybe six, or when wind or space are low. Flying in larger groups or in large spaces 120s provide more sky in which to play.

Nothing cut in stone here, just the way we fly.

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Hey Captainbob, I'm also going to recommend 100ft or 120ft, 120s are preferable IMO... You just never know when you'll run into another Rev pilot and the 120s are the team flying standard, so more pilots are apt to carry them. I agree with Jim, I say lines outlast kites, and in my case, sets of kites. 90# line is best for a beginner, once again IMO.

The longer lines are beneficial to a beginning Rev pilot, you'll have more time within the wind window to act/react. I'd advise against going shorter than 75ft until you have a good grasp on the fundamentals, as you'll have less time to act/react. Once you have an understanding, however, the sky's the limit... fly it on 5ft lines (or just grab the bridle!) all the way up to far far away :)

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Hey Captain, Let us know how your first flight goesani_yahoo.gif or angry.png

Will do, watching alot of videos now, and hoping to fly my other Kite tomorrow, an HQ Symphony 1.8

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When I unroll my old Skybond 150's it takes so long I almost forget what I'm out there doing. I did get a set of LPG quad 90# x 120's based on the large window idea & hope of team flying someday. But have actually only tried them once as I am a solo hill billie flyer.

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When I unroll my old Skybond 150's it takes so long I almost forget what I'm out there doing. I did get a set of LPG quad 90# x 120's based on the large window idea & hope of team flying someday. But have actually only tried them once as I am a solo hill billie flyer.

Don't be so hard on yourself. You'd be a hill billie kiter if you were using a tarp tied to some sticks.

120's should be fine for most anybody because you need lots of open land for the smoothest wind. Short beaches excepted.

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I also recomend 120' lines if you have the space to use them. I used to be a solo flyer using mostly 85' lines until I attended a rev clinic. I set up with my brand new set of 120' lines and was practicing hovers and what not. when all of the sudden 1 more experinced flyer ask if they could fly with me, I said of coarse. Next thing you know a couple more pilots joined in and we were team flying with 4 flyers. I must admit I was hooked and loving it.

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I fly alone 99% of the time. If there is wind and room..the 120s are coming out! Just gives you sooo much area to play with.

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I totally agree that 120s should be your next choice! Always grab the opportunity to fly with others when you can! Even using 120s on your own, the slowed down feel of the kite is a great lesson in the control department!

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I agree with everyone all round for going with 120,s and when you purchase your next Rev with the standard

80/85 foot set, cut them down to make 30 and 50 foot sets unsleeved at the kite end.

That should just about cover you for all wind and location conditions. ani_victory.gif

Bill

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I agree with everyone all round for going with 120,s and when you purchase your next Rev with the standard

80/85 foot set, cut them down to make 30 and 50 foot sets unsleeved at the kite end.

That should just about cover you for all wind and location conditions. ani_victory.gif

Bill

How do you use the lines "unsleeved"? doesn't that make them weaker at the knot.

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If you look at your bridles you will see many unsleeved knots. When you tie spectra into knots the unsleeved the knot is weaker if you use certain knots. You could use a figure eight knot with minimal concerns. The ability to untie the knot will be a problem but you can make adjustments on the other end that is still sleeved. As an old rock climbing caver I bet my life on knots many times. So I don't generally want to compromise my line. I have broken a kite line at a knot. It was part way up a 50# line & even though I saw it, I could not get it loose without damaging the line. It broke in a strong gust. You can tease knots apart with a common pin but the 50# spectra is very fine. Some people use 90# as a minimum.

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Un sleeved is just as reliable, you just make bigger than normal loops with a stopper knot built in, to adjust you simply add more knots into the longest strand

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If you go for unsleeved, put a little pull tab onto the loop. This aids undoing the larks head.

Not too sure what a Stopper Knot is.

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Like a pull tab, but permanent, you build the stopper knot into the line at the halfway point, before the loop is closed, then you have an easy release.

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Like a pull tab, but permanent, you build the stopper knot into the line at the halfway point, before the loop is closed, then you have an easy release.

Got you. Thanks.

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Off topic?

I use forceps frequently with line making~ to lock and hold,~as a heat shield when melting ends and ~to measure

You measure

by grasping the melted end of the roll's line ending point in the jaws and wrap AROUND length-wise from the tip to the locking mechanism, then back to the tip again. If you have really shortie forceps, then do this a second time.

Pinch that new mark 'tween thumb & index finger. That will become the center of your loop upon it's completion, so you have "measured" 50% of it's overall flat size. Now move the forceps to this new point and pinch tightly on the single strand.

Take the end point you just released and pass it over itself and back thru, around that tautly held strand TWICE. Pull it tightly, so the knot slides/butts against the jaws of the forceps to your new measured point. Separate the two strand and set the knot tightly.

Add in double overhand knot next (which will slide or move easily on raw spectra) near the end point. Separate the two strand halves, one into each hand and yank that knot into final position. It can't "jump" those doubled laps at the half way point though, that's why they're there!

Next you will move the forceps to the back-end of the "still to be formed" loop by sliding both strands along your finger's pinched grasp until you get near the end, when you will place a figure of eight knot to close off the loop. Place the forceps jaws at this final spot, insuring both strands are uniformly tight with the stopper knot exactly centered. (you should have practiced slipping half of the figure of eight knot OVER itself and sliding all the resulting slack back-out away from the forceps FIRST before attempting lineset creation on your new roll of spectra).

The beautiful part about building your flying lines in this manner is that all the measurements are perfectly uniform and the final knot (to close off the loop) can be located ANYWHERE along that length and they will still come out right!

I recommend you make larger than normal loops though, since you can only shorten them for equalization purposes.

The kite end of the lines should never have sleeving, so they separate individually much more easily during initial set-ups. The handle end of the flying lines can have sleeving, but it should be the same material as your adjustment leaders (less opportunity to snag or tangle when throwing the kite around if everything is uniform)

Go buy your own, but get a comfortable finger hole size that fits you. Forceps will make knot makings on a kite so much easier,..... go sleeve-less!

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How do you use the lines "unsleeved"? doesn't that make them weaker at the knot.

The answers already given fully cover your query and remember that if you are using short lines it would usually be in low wind conditions where the pull on the lines is reduced !

Assume that you are using 90lb LPG unsleeved, rate it at 50% for any knots and or damage and that still gives a breaking strain of 45lbs which is still one hell of a load on EACH line ! ani_victory.gif

I recently snagged a line, 120ft,90lb LPG, on a jacket zip and it was so badly frayed that I had to cut the damaged length a couple of feet from the end.

I then added a spare length of LPG joining the ends with a bloodknot, see image, and then match the other lines.

I fly using these lines on a vented Rev in 20mph winds, no problem ! ani_yahoo.gif

Bill

post-3812-0-13010600-1391609936_thumb.jpg

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After reading & posting on this topic I got inspired to fly my 120's today. I first flew with a 1.5B mid-vent & three wrap spars. I certainly did enjoy the larger window of the longer lines. In my typical inland changing wind I did see some sagging of lines when the wind let up. But during the mid level & higher winds I felt well connected to the kite. The stronger gusts had me at the top of the window with the lines singing their sweet whine I love so much. Next I switched to my original full sail SLE taking out the black race frame & putting in the unloved SLE. I had not used the heavy leading edge in a long time especially since getting a race frame. I noticed the window got even larger than possible with the mid-vent. I could fly locked into the power easily. I was practicing flying lazy eights in preparation for using Revs for buggy power. I suppose my skills are better than when I first flew with the SLE & I did not really have any struggle with control. I also realized that the 1.5 will be enough kite to pull a buggy on higher wind days.

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